Monday, January 24, 2011

Jobs with no sence of reality

So I was thinking about this today, jobs that have pricks for management and they don't understand anything. So picture this... you are in a very bad car accident and end up in the hospital. Your job is notified about it, then instead of contacting you to see how you are they decide to mail you your check and to hell with you. How about you find out you have cancer and can't work at the moment when you need to take chemo, the job decides to terminate you rather then holding your job for you. This has happened before to people I know and me being one of them. It is amazing at how emotionless employers are. I have a friend who couldn't get to work because of a very bad snow storm. They then told him he had to make it in and he said he couldn't so they demoted him. What would happen if someone tried to go into work and got killed in a car accident? Would you then feel bad about it? Answer is probably not. This working world is becoming hell for people. Employers are making people go to work when working is not a priority for that day, staying safe inside is. What about the places such as a major retail chain which I will not name. Their policy is "We are open all the time even in a blizzard. We will all be here with a smile on our face". That place hires and fires like there is no tomorrow. No wonder why, they pay minimum wage and give their cashiers a daily sales quota with NO commission. If the cashiers are not able to sign up enough people for their charge cards they get fired. If you are an employee who is reading this and has an employer like this I feel your pain. I have been there and done that. If you are an employer who expects this from your employee's get a fucking grip. If there is a snow storm with 2 feet of snow being dumped on the roads its not worth risking your life as well as your employee's lives. If something does happen to one of them your company can be risking a lot more then loosing a few bucks for the day. Also please if someone is very ill and needs time off LET THEM!

Thursday, January 13, 2011

Freecreditreport.com

Freecreditreport.com is a real shady company. You sign up for a free credit report but then you need to give your credit card information. When you call up to cancel they try and hard sell you into staying with them. I have had to yell at the rep to cancel my membership and he finally did. I warned my mother against using them but she did anyways. I was there when my mother was on the phone trying to cancel with them. They charged her account when she was still under her free trial. She threatened to report them to the attorney general and that was when they decided to cancel. Affiliates of them were posting non existing jobs on craigslist and then when you tried to apply they would send you a link to get a credit report that the job supposedly required. Only that there was no job though. I then sent them an e-mail explaining what an affiliate of theirs was doing. I never heard back. I suggest to the owners of this company that they had better change their ways or else they will lose a TON of business. I checked out ripoffreport.com on this company and there are tons and tons of complaints regarding unauthorized charges to peoples accounts. That is all I have to say about them.

Wednesday, January 12, 2011

Pyramid Scheme's

Pyramid scheme's are HIGHLY illegal. Here is the definition of it which I got from Wikipedia. The definition on the site is very accurate.

A pyramid scheme is a non-sustainable business model that involves promising participants payment, services or ideals, primarily for enrolling other people into the scheme or training them to take part, rather than supplying any real investment or sale of products or services to the public. Pyramid schemes are a form of fraud.[1][2]

Pyramid schemes are illegal in many countries including Albania, Denmark, Australia,[3] Brazil, Bulgaria, Canada, China,[4] Colombia,[5] Estonia,[6] France, Germany, Hungary, Iceland,[citation needed] Iran,[7] Italy,[8] Japan,[9] Malaysia, Mexico, Nepal,[citation needed] The Netherlands,[10] New Zealand,[11] Norway,[12] the Philippines,[13] Poland, Portugal, Romania,[14] South Africa,[15] Sri Lanka,[16] Switzerland, Taiwan, Thailand,[17] Turkey,[18] the United Kingdom, and the United States.[19]

These types of schemes have existed for at least a century, some with variations to hide their true nature, and many people believe that multilevel marketing is also a pyramid scheme.[20][21][22][23]
Contents
[hide]

* 1 Concept and basic models
o 1.1 The "Eight-Ball" model
o 1.2 Matrix schemes
* 2 Connection to multi-level marketing
* 3 Connection to Franchise Fraud
* 4 Notable recent cases
o 4.1 Internet
o 4.2 Others
* 5 In popular culture
* 6 See also
* 7 References
* 8 External links

[edit] Concept and basic models
This article may contain original research. Please improve it by verifying the claims made and adding references. Statements consisting only of original research may be removed. More details may be available on the talk page. (February 2009)

A successful pyramid scheme combines a fake yet seemingly credible business with a simple-to-understand yet sophisticated-sounding money-making formula which is used for profit. The essential idea is that a "con artist" Mr. X, makes only one payment. To start earning, Mr. X has to recruit others like him who will also make one payment each. Mr. X gets paid out of receipts from those new recruits. They then go on to recruit others. As each new recruit makes a payment, Mr. X gets a cut. He is thus promised exponential benefits as the "business" expands.

Such "businesses" seldom involve sales of real products or services to which a monetary value might be easily attached. However, sometimes the "payment" itself may be a non-cash valuable. To enhance credibility, most such scams are well equipped with fake referrals, testimonials, and information. The flaw is that there is no end benefit. The money simply travels up the chain. Only the originator (sometimes called the "pharaoh") and a very few at the top levels of the pyramid make significant amounts of money. The amounts dwindle steeply down the pyramid slopes. Individuals at the bottom of the pyramid (those who subscribed to the plan, but were not able to recruit any followers themselves) end up with a deficit.
[edit] The "Eight-Ball" model

Many pyramids are more sophisticated than the simple model. These recognize that recruiting a large number of others into a scheme can be difficult so a seemingly simpler model is used. In this model each person must recruit two others, but the ease of achieving this is offset because the depth required to recoup any money also increases. The scheme requires a person to recruit two others, who must each recruit two others, who must each recruit two others.
The "eight-ball" model contains a total of fifteen members. Note that unlike in the picture, the triangular setup in the cue game of eight-ball corresponds to an arithmetic progression 1 + 2 + 3 + 4 + 5 = 15. The pyramid scheme in the picture in contrast is a geometric progression 1 + 2 + 4 + 8 = 15.

Prior instances of this scheme have been called the "Airplane Game" and the four tiers labelled as "captain," "co-pilot," "crew," and "passenger" to denote a person's level. Another instance was called the "Original Dinner Party" which labelled the tiers as "dessert," "main course," "side salad," and "appetizer." A person on the "dessert" course is the one at the top of the tree. Another variant, "Treasure Traders," variously used gemology terms such as "polishers," "stone cutters," etc. or gems like "rubies," "sapphires," "diamonds," etc.

Such schemes may try to downplay their pyramid nature by referring to themselves as "gifting circles" with money being "gifted." Popular schemes such as the "Women Empowering Women"[24] do exactly this.

Whichever euphemism is used, there are 15 total people in four tiers (1 + 2 + 4 + 8) in the scheme - with the Airplane Game as the example, the person at the top of this tree is the "captain," the two below are "co-pilots," the four below are "crew," and the bottom eight joiners are the "passengers."

The eight passengers must each pay (or "gift") a sum (e.g. $1000) to join the scheme. This sum (e.g. $8000) goes to the captain who leaves, with everyone remaining moving up one tier. There are now two new captains so the group splits in two with each group requiring eight new passengers. A person who joins the scheme as a passenger will not see a return until they advance through the crew and co-pilot tiers and exit the scheme as a captain. Therefore, the participants in the bottom 3 tiers of the pyramid lose their money if the scheme collapses.

If a person is using this model as a scam, the confidence trickster would make the lion's share of the money. They would do this by filling in the first 3 tiers (with 1, 2, and 4 people) with phoney names, ensuring they get the first 7 payouts, at 8 times the buy-in sum, without paying a single penny themselves. So if the buy-in were $1000, they would receive $8,000, paid for by the first 8 investors. They would continue to buy in underneath the real investors, and promote and prolong the scheme for as long as possible to allow them to skim even more from it before it collapses.

Although the 'Captain' is the person at the top of the tree, having received the payment from the 8 paying passengers, once he or she leaves the scheme is able to re-enter the pyramid as a 'Passenger' and hopefully recruit enough to reach captain again, thereby earning a second payout.
[edit] Matrix schemes
Main article: Matrix scheme

Matrix schemes use the same fraudulent non-sustainable system as a pyramid; here, the participants pay to join a waiting list for a desirable product which only a fraction of them can ever receive. Since matrix schemes follow the same laws of geometric progression as pyramids, they are subsequently as doomed to collapse. Such schemes operate as a queue, where the person at head of the queue receives an item such as a television, games console, digital camcorder, etc. when a certain number of new people join the end of the queue. For example ten joiners may be required for the person at the front to receive their item and leave the queue. Each joiner is required to buy an expensive but potentially worthless item, such as an e-book, for their position in the queue. The scheme organizer profits because the income from joiners far exceeds the cost of sending out the item to the person at the front. Organizers can further profit by starting a scheme with a queue with shill names that must be cleared out before genuine people get to the front. The scheme collapses when no more people are willing to join the queue. Schemes may not reveal, or may attempt to exaggerate, a prospective joiner's queue position which essentially means the scheme is a lottery. Some countries have ruled that matrix schemes are illegal on that basis.
[edit] Connection to multi-level marketing
Main article: Multi-level marketing

The network marketing or multi-level marketing business has become associated with pyramid schemes as "Some schemes may purport to sell a product, but they often simply use the product to hide their pyramid structure."[25] and the fact while some people call MLMs in general "pyramid selling"[26][27][28][29][30] others use the term to denote an illegal pyramid scheme masquerading as an MLM.[31]

The FTC warns "Not all multilevel marketing plans are legitimate. Some are pyramid schemes. It’s best not to get involved in plans where the money you make is based primarily on the number of distributors you recruit and your sales to them, rather than on your sales to people outside the plan who intend to use the products." [32] and states that research is your best tool and gives eight steps to follow:

1. Find — and study — the company’s track record.
2. Learn about the product
3. Ask questions
4. Understand any restrictions
5. Talk to other distributors (beware shills)
6. Consider using a friend or adviser as a neutral sounding board or for a gut check.
7. Take your time.
8. Think about whether this plan suits your talents and goals[33]

Some believe MLMs in general are nothing more than legalized pyramid schemes[20][21][22][23] making the issue of a particular MLM being legal or not moot.

With that said linked to MLM's you need to be very careful with what network marketing (MLM) company you get involved with. Make sure you look at their product and see if it is really legit.

Monday, January 10, 2011

Powerline 100

I have been researching this MLM called Powerline 100 for several weeks now. Their product is a Power Pack Library which has several different kinds of books. This program seems to have not been around very long. I am however concerned with some of the things I have read. They advertise in several business opportunity magazines and say that they have a live call every Tuesday and Thursday nights. When you call the number that they leave in the magazine it then directs you to another number. Then they say that due to high demand the live calls are now recordings available 24/7 so there are no more live calls. Also when I took a look at their website it says that their are recorded training calls to listen to 20-30 hours worth. It doesn't say anything about live training calls or any live calls. If you want to get people into your company you need to have live calls. You are able to speak with your sponsor but what about the owners of the company? I have also read a review from someone who said that they have no back office which is very important. A back office is support ensuring your success in this business. Powerline 100 says that they have a back office so I am not sure what to believe in this situation. I cannot find much on the background of this company. There is no address listed for them not even a city/state or PO Box so you don't even know where they are out of. I can't look up their business license because of this. I have searched ripoffreport.com and cannot find anything. So obviously they really haven't been around long at all. Even companies that are not scams have reports on that site. Powerline 100 charges $100 to join which is given to their sponsor. They then charge a $7.00 admin fee. Then there is a $30 monthly fee after. So we are not talking about thousands of dollars to join but its still money. It seems to me that Powerline 100 is a pyramid scheme and I would be very cautious about joining it. Oh and they also do not provide refunds either.

419 Scammer

This to inform you that your funds of US$28.5 Million has been approved and will be deliver to you through the service of A Diplomat Attached with our Bank to deliver the cash to your given address


I am the Cash Payment Director Of GT Bank Of London and as far as you follow my directives you will never regret this transaction. Never you disclose this new arrangement to anybody till you claim this fund and also i will assist you to sure the document that can enable you to deposit the fund into your account or anybank of your chioce as soon as you receive this fund.


You are hereby advised to forward these details to this office below:

(1) Your Full Names:
(2) Your Address :
(3) Direct Telephone Number for easy access of communication.
(4) Your Occupation
(5)Send Any Of your personal id to avoid wrong delivery.
(6) A promissory note that you will pay me 30% for as a compensation after you received your fund.

The Funds will be delivering to you within a maximum of 48 hours on receiving the requested details.

The information should therefore be sent in the manner stated below: send email: la.su.cbn@gmail.com

so as to ensure that no mistake is made. call me on my private phone number Tel: +44 702 407 5216 as soon as you receive this message


Mr Nelson Dickson
Cash Payment Director
Gt Bank London
Tel: +44 702 407 5216

Saturday, January 8, 2011

It has been a while

Hey everyone! It has been a while since I have written. I have been putting a lot of hours working lately but I am back. I have a potential scam I have been researching but I don't want to put a name to it yet. More to come people......

Wednesday, January 5, 2011

419 Scammer

I hope everyone has had a great holiday season. I have been gathering information for my next entry. I will post it in a few days. Here is a 419 e-mail I just received in the meantime.

This to inform you that your funds of US$28.5 Million has been approved and will be deliver to you through the service of A Diplomat Attached with our Bank to deliver the cash to your given address


I am the Cash Payment Director Of GT Bank Of London and as far as you follow my directives you will never regret this transaction. Never you disclose this new arrangement to anybody till you claim this fund and also i will assist you to sure the document that can enable you to deposit the fund into your account or anybank of your chioce as soon as you receive this fund.


You are hereby advised to forward these details to this office below:

(1) Your Full Names:
(2) Your Address :
(3) Direct Telephone Number for easy access of communication.
(4) Your Occupation
(5)Send Any Of your personal id to avoid wrong delivery.
(6) A promissory note that you will pay me 30% for as a compensation after you received your fund.

The Funds will be delivering to you within a maximum of 48 hours on receiving the requested details.

The information should therefore be sent in the manner stated below: send email: la.su.cbn@gmail.com

so as to ensure that no mistake is made. call me on my private phone number Tel: +44 702 407 5216 as soon as you receive this message


Mr Nelson Dickson
Cash Payment Director
Gt Bank London
Tel: +44 702 407 5216